5th Royal Canin International Cat Show 2019’ from 8th – 10th March 2019 at BCC Hall, 5th floor,  CentralPlaza Ladprao

Meet the purrfect world-class award-winning pedigree cats attending competition in Thailand, a spectacular event cat lovers must not miss…

CentralPlaza Lardprao and the Cat Fanciers’ Club of Thailand (CFCT) are holding the “5th Royal Canin International Cat Show 2019” from 8th to 10th March 2019 at BCC Hall, 5th floor, CentralPlaza Lardprao. The event will be held to promote and encourage greater development for cats and owners and to give the opportunity for an international competition. This is the first time that Thailand is presenting its standard cat breeds, thanks to the collaboration of Thai cat farms and the Thailand Cat Club (TCC). This free-of-charge event will also help supporting Thai tourism.

 

Special Highlights:

– Cat contests for Thai breeds, for all international cat breeds with pedigree certificates from various associations, for castrated cats and mixed-breed cats (4 Rings).

– Judges have been certified by the international Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA).

– International cat competitions certified by CFA 8 Rings Standard.

– Meet the chunky ‘Barrol’, a popular celebrity cat who will be presented at the booth of Thonglor Pet Hospital, where experts and veterinarians will offer free consultations, health-checkups, anti-flea drops and rabies vaccinations for your pets.

– Discover celebrity cats such as Barrol from the ‘JowBarrol’ Facebook page, Johnny The Copper Cat, Hachi Hane from the Hashiharit Facebook page, Meeboon from the Meeboon Facebook page, and superstar cats from the MEO Me & You Series, who will create a fun vibeat the event.

– There will be a variety of choices for pet food and interesting items which are ideal for pet lovers.

– A ‘Free’ DIY corner for cat lovers will be run by the CFCT.

– There will be cat sterilization services and ‘Find a home for stray cats’ with ‘Rakmaew’ for theStray Cats Foundation, supported by the CFCT.

Enjoy all these activities at the ‘5th Royal Canin International Cat Show 2019’ from 8 th to 10 th March 2019 at BCC Hall, 5 th floor, CentralPlaza Lardprao.

 

 

 

 

For further information and full details, please contact:Viritsamalar Aroonlert, Corporate Communications, Central Pattana plcTel: 098 282 9559 or Call Center 0-2635-1111

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.

In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.

There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.

No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.

But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.

Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

The Indian ambassador lighting the lamp to inaugurate the festival

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.
In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.
There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.
No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.
But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.
Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.

In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.

There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.

No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.

But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.

Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

FIRST-EVER ‘NORTH EAST INDIA FESTIVAL’ IN THAILAND

Dazzling range of activities, on 9-10 February, at Central World

The first-ever ‘North-East Festival of India’ will be held in Bangkok, on 9th and 10th of February, at Central World (Zones A and B).The North-East region of India consists of seven exotic and culturally rich states- Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur, Mizoram, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Tripura. Some of the ethnic tribes in the region speak the ‘Tai’ language (which closely resembles the Thai language), and infact, it was none other than HRH Princess Mahachakri Sirindhorn, who visited this region some years back.

These North-Eastern states which have close geographical proximity to Thailand, have become a great gateway to SE Asia, and infact, have come to the forefront of India’s ‘Act East’ policy.

To quote the newly-arrived Indian Ambassador to Thailand, HE Ms Suchitra Durai- ” I am delighted that the first-ever North East India Festival outside of India is being held at Bangkok on 9-10 February, 2019 at the Central World. North East India has much to offer – breathtaking landscapes, top class human resources, a rich and diverse cultural heritage. We invite Thais to savour this distinct region of Incredible India.

“In order to introduce the riches of this region to the Land of Smiles, the Embassy of India, in collaboration with various partners , has organised a mega ‘North-East India Festival’, on the coming week-end, which covers a large and exciting range of activities.They include seminars and discussions on bilateral trade and investment, education, tourism, with important participants from both countries.

They include academics, historians, entrepreneurs, tour operators, and hi-level officials from the Govt of India, State Govts of North-East India, and Govt of Thailand.

These ‘Business’ meetings will be held at the Lotus Suite, Centara Grand Hotel, on the mornings of 9 and 10 February.

The afternoons will be studded with Exhibitions, and a scintillating range of music and dance performances, in Zone A and Zone B, of Central World.

The seven North-East states or ‘Seven Sisters’ as they are called, have a rich and varied range of folk traditions, and these will be in full display at the Festival, through their colourful and charismatic folk-dance forms, like the Naga, Manipuri,Bodo, Bihu, Bagrumba, Assamese and other dances.

What’s unique about the North-East region of India, is that apart from ethnic tribes,they have a diverse range of communities, religions, thanks to which they boast of diverse and rapidly developing music forms. Thus, they have brilliant pop, rock, rap bands, and also some famed individual singers.

Many top rock bands of North-East India, like The Chronicles, The Featherheads, and others will be performing at the North East Indian Festival, as also well-knownindividual singers like Rahul Rajkhowa, Zubeen Garg, and international DJ Teri Miko.

What’s exciting to note is that there will be many Thai musical artistes also performing in conjunction with the North-East Indian performers.

The Fashion-scene is big in the North East Indian states, thanks to their rich textiles, ethnic traditions and individual styles. There have been some excellent fashion-shows from the region earlier, in Bangkok, and another scintillating one is coming up, at this Festival, by well-known designers Atsu Sekhose, Arita Kashyap and others.

There will also be many Exhibitions at Central World, with numerous stalls displaying the rich and varied textiles, arts and crafts of the region (handlooms, cane, bamboo), not to forget their horticultural products (fresh fruits, organic vegetables), as also the famed teas of Assam.

Last but not the least, will be the varied and vibrant cuisines of the seven North- East Indian states, which will be available on both evenings, at Central World – a rare opportunity to get a taste of the unique food of this region.

So, watch out for a dazzling blitzkrieg of activities, this weekend, at the North- East India Festival – everything, from culture and cuisine, to economics and academics, trade and tourism. And most important, people-to-people contacts and exchanges.

Infact, a special program of the Festival, involves a unique ‘People to People Exchange Programme’ on 10th February, among students, academicians, historiansfrom North East India and their South East Asian counterparts, in order to discuss their shared heritage.

It’s easily one of the largest and most holistic Indian Festivals to be held in the Land of Smiles, and not to be missed.

All the events at Central World, are Free and open to the public

All the events at Centara Grand Hotel, are on Invitation.For more details of the ‘North East India Festival’, please check:

http://northeastfestival.com/#schedule

https://www.facebook.com/IndianEmbassyThailand/

========================

All invited to line HM the King’s Bike Un Ai Rak route and attend the fair


His Majesty the King has graciously allowed the second Un Ai Rak event to take place from December 9, 2018 to January 19, 2019. His Majesty will personally launch the activity at 2:30 p.m. on December 9 before joining in as a rider in the Bike Un Ai Rak event, cycling along an historic path from Dusit Palace to Lad Pho canal in Samut Prakan province. 

People are invited to line the route to show their loyalty to His Majesty the King as well as to attend the Un Ai Rak fair in Bangkok between December 9 and January 19. 

 All Thai citizens are invited to attend the Un Ai Rak Khlai Kwam Nao: Streams of the Rattanakosin activity taking place this month at Dusit Palace and Sanam Sua Pa. 



Pictures! Priyanka and Nick’s Mehendi!

We have some amazing pictures from Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Mehndi! You can feel the ebullience and the love!

Priyanka wrote on Instagram, ”One of the most special things our relationship has given us is a merging of families who love and respect each other’s faiths and cultures. And so planning our wedding with an amalgamation of both was so amazing. An important part for the girl in India is the Mehendi. Once again we made it our own and it was an afternoon that kicked off the celebrations in the way we both dreamed.”

We would write more but you are not reading it we know!!!

T

he happy couple were married in a Christian ceremony today but more on that and all the wedding celebrations later!

Scientifically Speaking, Women Like Their BFFs More Than Their Husband

Countless movies have told us our significant other is our best friend. The movie ends when you find ‘the one’ & all is right with the world.

by Aishwarya Dharni

But guess what? for women IRL, nobody can replace their BFFs, not even their one true love.
According to a study, women like their best friends more than their spouses.


1517 women were a part of the study and more than 50 per cent claimed that their girlfriends were their first priority and not their husbands.

There a lot of reasons why women would prefer their BFFs over their BAEs but the ones listed in the study were:
Women feel they can tell their best friend anything and everything as compared to their husbands.

And that led to them saying that their best friends are better listeners.

They also added that they feel more at ease with their personality in front of their besties rather than their hubbies.

Some of them went as far as saying that their gal-pal got on their nerves less than their romantic pal, and that they have a better sense of humour.

And lastly, since women are born-therapists, most of them feel that their best friend offered way better advice than their husbands.

Guys, more for you to be jealous of.

Virat Kohli Has Switched To A Vegan Lifestyle, Should You Be Too?

From being a chubby-faced cricketer who loves his homemade delicious Punjabi food, especially his personal favourite, biryani, Virat Kholi has been on a remarkable transformational fitness journey. Kohli’s current diet includes protein shakes, vegetables and soya, as he’s given up eggs and diary for good.

“Kohli started this diet four months ago and is feeling stronger as his digestive power has increased. He isn’t missing meat, eggs or diary. Two years ago, when he was on a normal diet he had said that he would go vegan if given a choice. He is now feeling stronger than before,” claims sources.

The news of captain Kohli turning vegan has stirred the age-old debate over whether the vegan diet is healthy or not. While the Indian skipper’s decision to go vegan might be a part of his fitness journey, it is important to note that many celebrated sports personalities like Serena Williams, Lewis Hamilton and Carl Lewis are already a part of the vegan club and are seen promoting the vegan lifestyle.

So, whether you are planning to turn vegan or are just curious about the health benefits that this plant-based diet has to offer, here is all that you need to know.

What is the vegan diet?

A vegan diet is a completely plant-based diet consisting of vegetables, beans, grains, nuts etc.

Being vegan is different from being a vegetarian, as they still consume dairy and eggs, and it is NOT an abbreviated way to say ‘vegetarian’.

What all can you eat if you’re going vegan?

Keep in mind that this list is not exhaustive.

1. Vegetables and fruits

2. Grains

3. Beans and legumes

4. Nuts and seeds

5. Tofu

6. Plant-based oils

What are the health benefits of going vegan?

While researches have shown several health benefits of a vegan diet including high vitamin C levels and fibre levels when compared to a non-vegan diet, it is how you follow the diet that decides its health benefits. Ultimately, it all depends on what you eat as even if you are living on fries and chips (yes, they are vegan) while being on a vegan diet, it is not good for your health.

1. Risk of cardiovascular disease drops

It is an established fact that diets containing meat are rich in saturated fat and cholesterol. On the other hand, by going vegan you significantly reduce the saturated fat intake, which in turn, lowers your risk for heart diseases.

2. You lose weight

As you switch to a plant-based diet which is rich in fibres, you may start to feel full sooner than usual, thanks to the fibre-rich diet that is easier on the digestion.

3. You might become happier

No, we are not kidding. A research has found out that those who follow vegan diets might be happier than those who eat fish and meat.

4. Fewer migraines

Foods like chocolates and cheese are one of the most common triggers for a migraine as it is linked to our diets and eating habits. Hence, if you are on a vegan diet you are automatically more mindful of what you are putting inside your mouth, leading to fewer migraine triggers.

5. Healthier skin

Being rich in Vitamin C, a plant-based diet could do wonders to your skin. This happens because a vegan diet tends to be rich in antioxidants, which helps fighting acne and other skin issues. It also provides a healthy glow to your skin and helps with collagen synthesis, which in turn keeps your skin looking younger and healthier.

Vegan for the environment?

Interestingly, this plant-based diet is exceptionally good for the environment as according to the researchers at the University of Oxford, shunning dairy and meat products could reduce a person’s carbon’ footprint (from food) by up to 73 per cent.


It could also result in a significant drop in greenhouse gas emissions as the findings of the research point out that meat and dairy productions are responsible for 60 per cent of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions while using 83 per cent of the farmland.

The takeaway

However, one must remember that when you are eliminating animal and animal products from your diet, you are also putting yourself at the risk of missing some important nutrients including vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, and omega-3 fatty acids.

If you are following a strictly vegan diet, make sure that you take additional supplements to balance your diet, as some vitamins like vitamin B12 occur naturally only in animal foods like eggs and milk. In fact, plant-based calcium and iron are not as easily absorbed when compared to the kind in meat.

Keep in mind that balance is the key as following a vegan-diet does have health benefits if it is well-planned.

With inputs from TNN

15 reasons to visit Pravasi Bharatiya Divas

15 reasons to visit Pravasi Bharatiya Divas

 

1. Ganga Aarti

The Varanasi Ganga Aarti takes place every sunset at the holy Dasaswamedh Ghat, near Kashi Vishwanath Temple. The aarti is performed on a stage by a group of pandits, all draped in saffron colored robes with their puja plates spread out before them. It commences with the blowing of a conch shell, and continues with the waving of incense sticks in elaborate patterns and circling of large flaming lamps that create a bright hue against the darkened sky. The movement of the lamps, held in the pandits’ hands, is tightly synchronized to the rhythmic chants of hymns and clang of cymbals.

 

2. Dip in holy Ganges

There are plenty of ghats in Varanasi, from where devotees can take a holy dip in the Ganges and it is considered to be the most auspicious moment by all Hindu religion believers. You do not want to miss the chance to fulfil the millennia old tradition while you are at the Pravasi Bharatiya Divas.

3. Boat ride

Some say the majesty of the Ganges River is best appreciated as the sun is rising and setting. In the morning you can experience the red sun rising in the east, shining on pilgrims as they start their bathing rituals. In the evening you can experience Ganga Aarti too.

 

4. Seek blessings at temples

The Vishwanath Temple of Kasi (Varanasi) is one of the oldest and most sacred Hindu temples in India. It is one of the 12 Jyotirlingas – important centres of Shiva worship. The Sankat Mochan Hanuman Temple of Varanasi is said to have been established by the renowned saint Goswami Tulsidas and reconstructed by Pt. Madan Mohan Malviya in the early 20th century. Located quite close to the Vishwanath Temple, is the Annapurna Devi temple where the Goddess Parvati is worshipped as the giver of food and nourishment.

5. Enjoy the street food

Street food is an essential part of Indian culture and cuisine. There are a number of street foods from across the country that are famous, but nothing that beats the hot and crispy kachoris and samosas from Benaras. Vegetarian delicacies are majorly prepared in desi ghee and mustard oil, be it spicy, sweet or sour. Most Varanasi sweets have a milk and ghee base like the Magdal, Sankat Mochan ke Laddoo, Parval Mithai, Kheer Mohan and Launglata among others.

6. Soak in music and dance of banarasi gharana

Varanasi also developed as a great center of Dhrupad style of singing. In the 16th century, Govind Chandra ruled Varanasi and during his regime Dhrupad became the count music. With the development of Dhrupad, other styles like Dhamar, Hori and Chaturang also grew. The famous Assarwari, “Ghunghat ke pat Khol” was made famous by the Nirgun singers of Kashi while Meer Rustam (the Nawab of Awadh) patronised music festivals like Jhoola, Jhoomar, Kajri, Birha, Dangal, Gulab Bari as well as music on boats. Varanasi is also associated with many great instrumentalists. Shehnai maestro Ustad Bismillah Khan is famous worldwide while Sitar maestro Pandit Ravi Shankar has earned wide acclaim throughout the world.

7. Weavers of Varanasi

In the city as old as time, with a weaving tradition that is equally historic, Benarasi saris have kept abreast with changing tastes. The sarees are among the finest sarees in India and are known for their gold and silver brocade or zari, fine silk and opulent embroidery. The sarees are made of finely all had said this should be about Banarasi weaving including carpets etc and not just saris. Woven silk and are decorated with intricate design, and, because of these engravings, are relatively heavy.

 

8. Take a holy dip in triveni sangam

The Triveni Sangam, where the Kumbh Mela takes place, is the meeting place of three rivers: the Saraswati, Yamuna, and Ganga. The Triveni Sangam is considered to be a very sacred place in India to Hindus, who believe that taking a dip there will wash away sins and free them from the cycle of rebirth, thereby achieving Moksha.

 

9. Visit the Kumbh Mela

The Kumbh Mela is the largest gathering of humanity at any one. 100 millon people attended the Kumbh at Prayag in 2013! That is 1/10 of India’s population! All other congregations pale in comparison with the Kumbh. The ocean of humanity, the sea of tents, the colourful flags, countless pilgrims taking a dip in the water, the smell of smoke from holy fires, the beautiful sunrise it is a breathtaking panorama.

 

10. Discover the grandeur of UNESCO heritage sites

Unesco World heritage sites have always been a big attractions for traveler from all over the world and people like to visit these places very much. Specially travelers who love history and architecture love to visit world heritage sites all over the world. Delhi also have three Unesco world heritage sites – Red Fort, Humayun’s tomb and Qutub Minar and these are must visit when you are in Delhi.

 

11. Visit Chandni chowk – An ideal symbol of ‘Sarva Dharma Sambhava’

Chandni Chowk has emerged as an ideal symbol of Sarva Dharma Sambhava. It was initially shaped as a square at the centre of which was a pool that shimmered in the moonlight which is what the market is named after. The shops around the bazaar were arranged in a half moon pattern around the square. Delhi’s most famous mosque, Jama Masjid, was built in 1650 in the vicinity. The Gauri Shankar temple, the Central Baptist Church and the Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib are also located nearby.

 

12. Shopping in Delhi

The vibrant atmosphere of Delhi markets can make shopping lots of fun. In fact, Delhi has the best markets in India, selling a huge array of items including handicrafts from all over the country. These top markets in Delhi are a treasure trove of goods waiting to be discovered. The Delhi Haat, Tibetan Market on Janpath, Chandni Chowk, Sarojini Market, Khan market are some of them.

 

 

13. Visit Akshardham and Lotus Bahai Temple

Swaminarayan Akshardham Temple in New Delhi epitomizes 10,000 years of Indian culture in all its breathtaking grandeur, beauty, wisdom and bliss. It brilliantly showcases the essence of India’s ancient architecture, traditions and timeless spiritual messages. The Akshardham experience is an enlightening journey through India’s glorious art, values and contributions for the progress, happiness and harmony of mankind. The Lotus temple is built in the shape of a lotus flower and is the last of seven Major Bahai’s temples built around the world. Completed in 1986 it is set among the lush green landscaped gardens. The structure is made up of pure white marble. The architect Furiburz Sabha chose the lotus as the symbol common to Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Islam. Adherents of any faith are free to visit the temple and pray or meditate.

14. Relish local delicacies

The best way to know a city intimately, is to romance its food. A lot has been written about Delhi and its food, and justifiably so. Delhi loves it food. And more than that, it loves sharing its food with those who love all things delicious. If you wish to enjoy it, shed your high-brow attitude to soak in the flavours and delicacies. The streets are lined with halwais (sweet-sellers), namkeen wallahs (sellers of savouries) and paranthe wallahs.

15. Celebrate Republic Day including the parade at Rajpath

Republic Day honors the date of 26th January 1949 when the Constitution of India came into force as the governing document of the country. It marks India’s identity as a republic nation. The Republic Day Parade refers to the ceremonious parade on Rajpath, New Delhi, held every year on the same date. The parade showcases India’s Defence Capability, Cultural and Social Heritage. The Republic Day Parade takes places along Rajpath, in Delhi. Its route is more than five kilometers long. The parade sets out from Raisina Hill near Rashtrapati Bhavan (President’s Palace) and follows Rajpath past India Gate to the Red Fort.

 

Source: http://www.pbdindia.gov.in/en/15-reasons

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