First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.

In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.

There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.

No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.

But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.

Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

The Indian ambassador lighting the lamp to inaugurate the festival

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.
In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.
There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.
No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.
But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.
Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation.

A mega “Northeast India Festival”, comprising of trade, tourism, culture, academics and fashion was held this weekend in Bangkok, the first of its kind outside India. Chief organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta, who has held similar festivals in Delhi, informed that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Act East” policy had prompted him to undertake this mega Northeast India Festival, outside India. More more than 500 officials from Northeast Indian governments had flown down to Bangkok for the mega event. These included bureaucrats, MPS, tourism heads, entrepreneurs, academics, chefs and artistes.

“Northeast India, connected by a 22 km-corridor to mainland India, has always suffered due to its geographical isolation. But opening up Southeast Asia through Northeast India, is full of promise”, he stated.

In fact the tagline of the festival was “Connecting Northeast India to Southeast Asia.”

With the Northeast region sharing a common border with Southeast Asian countries like Bhutan, Thailand and Burma, the festival was an important event, especially as Thailand is chairman of the Asean this year. The 1582 km-long Trilateral Highway, from Manipur to Burma and Maesot in Thailand, to be ready next year, was often referred to in the discussions, as it was expected to make Northeast India, “the hub of Southeast Asia”.

Thai deputy commerce minister Chutima Bunyapraphasara inaugurated the “Northeast India Festival,” speaking of her good impressions of Assam during a business trip, and informing that she would be taking a trade delegation there in May.

The highlight of the Northeast India Festival in Bangkok were two important and well-attended seminars, aimed at increasing bilateral trade and tourism.

The Trade and Investment Seminar attracted as many as 100 participants. The Northeast Indian representatives spoke of the abundant natural resources available in their states, for which they required developmental support as also investments — bamboo, limestone, rubber, textiles, medicinal plants, construction, pharmaceuticals, hydro power, food processing, flowers and fruits, oil and gas and hotels and spas.

Thai entrepreneur Prim Jitcharoongphorn, who is also the president of the Thai-India Business Council, informed the Thai participants that “the current environment is very good to do business with India.”

“The market is big, the price is competitive, the compensation is the volume”, she declared.

Meanwhile, the Tourism Seminar was attended by more than 100 tour operators from Thailand, and 40 from Northeast India. The latter’s delegation was made up of the top officials from the tourism sector, including tourism heads, bureaucrats, MPs and advisers to the government.

The high-level officials enumerated the specialties of each Northeastern Indian state — rich fauna and flora, wildlife sanctuaries, trekking and adventure trails, Unesco heritage sites, cultural festivals, ecstasy and rural tourism. With Spice Jet announcing a direct two-hour flight from Bangkok to Gauhati in March, the tourism potential of the region received a big boost. The GM of the airline, Ajaykumar Gupta was proud that the flight would accentuate bilateral trade and tourism with Thailand.

The People to People Exchange event of the festival was attended by a galaxy of top scholars, academics and researchers from both countries. There were excellent presentations about the huge “Thai” connection with the Northeast Indian region, through the large number of “Tai” tribes living there. These were descendants of Thai migrants to Assam, as far back as the 11th century. It was fascinating to learn that the “Tai’s” language, script, customs, beliefs, rituals, festivals, food and cuisine closely resembled that of the “Thai” people in Thailand.

In fact, the much-loved Thai Indophile Princess H.R.H. Mahachakri Sirindhorn had visited the Northeastern region to meet and interact with these Ahoum tribes. Among the well-known academics at the “People to People Exchange”, were Thai Ahoum scholar and Assam MP Lakhya Konwar, famed scholar who has written many books on the Tai Ahoum community, professor Chattip Nartsupha, ethnographer-researcher Dr Rajni Gogoi, who organised whole event, and the VC of Gauhati Varsity Dr Mridul Hazarika of the “dedicated Southeast Asian department” in his varsity which offered “credits” to students from the Southeast Asian countries. In fact, a group of Thai students from the India Studies Centre of Thammasat Varsity were currently doing a semester there!

Meanwhile, a vibrant array of cultural performances were the ultimate icing to the festival cake. There was a grand display of old and new forms by the best artistes of the Northeast Indian region — folk dances from Nagaland and Manipur, famed rock bands Featherheads, Girish and the Chronicles, riveting rapper Rahul Rajkhowa, well-known Bollywood singer Zubeen Garg, and even an international DJ, Teri Miko.

There were fashion shows by three top designers too, displaying a seamless amalgam of traditional textiles with modern designs.

All the shows were held on the outside grounds of the popular Central World Mall, and attracted a mixed variety of audiences. It was not easy to pack in so many high-quality artistes, with the best of acoustics in an open-air setting, but the artistes did their best to produce some vibrant shows.

No mention was made of the political insurgency in the Northeast region, nor the troublesome Citizenship Bill.

But mention was made by several Northeastern Indian delegates about their Mongloid features, which made them feel like “outsiders” in their homeland. As one speaker said, “We have an identity crisis in India, but we have a face-connect in Thailand!”

The newly-arrived Indian ambassador to Thailand, Suchitra Durai, orchestrated the mega festival in less than two months, and said she was proud it was a “resounding success”. Organiser Shyamkanu Mahanta admitted that he never expected to get such ‘‘astounding support’ and was now tempted to do Northeast Indian Festivals in neighbouring Southeast Asian countries like Singapore and Laos.

Considering that this was an amazingly holistic festival which covered almost every aspect of the seven rich and diverse states of the Northeastern region, one must admit that the “Northeast India Festival” in Thailand was huge trailblazer indeed.

Source : The writer is a critic and commentator on films and culture based in Bangkok.

First N-E Festival outside India, in Bangkok, to push trade and tourism

Gurpurab 2018: Why Do We Celebrate Gurunanak Jayanti Or Gurpurab?

Guru Nanak Jayanti 2018: Gurpurab is celebrated as the day to remember the holy guru, Guru Nanak

 

Gurpurab or Guru Nanak Jayanti is the celebration of the birth of the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak, who laid the foundation of Sikhism. This year, Gurpurab will be celebrated on November 23. Gurpurab or Guru Nanak Jayanti is the most auspicious day in Sikhism and will celebrated with fervour on Friday, even as Gurpurab is celebrated of different days each year based on the Indian lunar calendar. This year would be the 549th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak. “Gurpurab” is made of two words– “Gur”, which means Guru or master, and “Purab”, which means parv in Hindi, meaning day. So Gurpurab is the day dedicated to the Guru.

Festivities on Guru Nanak Jayanti or Gurpurab are centred around the birth anniversaries of the ten Sikh gurus. The tenth and the last Sikh Guru was Guru Gobind Singh. After him, the sacred book of Sikhs, the Adi Granth or Guru Granth Sahib, which contains the writings of the gurus, is considered the guru.

Guru Nanak Gurpurab or Guru Nanak Jayanti is celebrated as the day to remember the holy guru, Guru Nanak, and is a reminder for the followers of Sikhism to remember his teachings and overcome the five vices – lust, greed, attachment, anger and pride and devote one’s life in the selfless service of God.

A look at the life of the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak:

 

Guru Nanak was born to Kalayan Das Mehta and Matta Tripat. From an early age, Guru Nanak had a spiritual inkling. He refused to wear the upper-caste Hindu-worn sacred thread as he did not believe in superficial aspects of religion. Guru Nanak said he would rather wear the God’s name in heart that could never be broken or get impure.

Guru Nanak worked as a storekeeper in a granary of Daulat Khan Lodi in Sultanpur, where he came in contact with Mardana, a Muslim servant. Together they organised gatherings for Hindus and Muslims where they sang hymns to praise the creator.

Guru Nanak was married at the age of 18 and bore two sons. But when Guru Nanak turned 28, he disappeared for three days. Upon returning, he said that there is no Hindu or Muslim but only one formless God which could be worshipped by all. Guru Nanak said that a constant remembrance of God, called naamsimran, is the only way to liberation.

These teachings of Guru Nanak stood out against the religious practices of his time and became part of Guru Granth Sahib, the holy book of the Sikhs.

Dussehra festival celebrated in Bangkok, Thailand

Hindus perform a ritual during a Dussehra celebration in downtown Bangkok, Thailand, October 19, 2018. Hindus in Bangkok joined a series of festivities on Saturday evening to observe Dussehra, a major Hindu festival marking Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana, the ten-headed demon king.

Sri MahaMariAmman Temple located at Silom road in Bangkok

All invited to attend prayers for Chakri Dynasty on Oct 15

All Thais are invited to attend a prayer session on Monday, October 15th at 6 pm to honor the past monarchs of the Chakri Dynasty and bless His Majesty King Rama the Tenth and Her Majesty Queen Sirikit of the Ninth Reign.

His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn has graciously granted permission to transfer a revered Buddha image Phra Buddhamanee Ratana Patimakorn to the ceremonial ground where all can pay their respects. The activity is also in line with the vision of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit of the Ninth Reign to uphold the religious codes.

His Holiness Somdej Ariya Wongsa Kotayan , the Supreme Patriarch will lead the prayer session with 207 other monks in the ceremony.

Information and Source

Reporter : Nuppol Suvansombut Rewriter : Rodney McNeil National News Bureau & Public Relations : http://thainews.prd.go.th

People celebrated Holi Festival of Colors in Bangkok

Ambassador of India to Thailand H.E. Mr. Bhagwant Singh Bishnoi and Mrs.Rupa Bishnoi

BANGKOK, THAILAND – MAR 11: People celebrated Holi Festival of Colors, Mar 11, 2018 in SHOW DC, Bangkok, Thailand.

The Indian community & Thais turned out in large numbers. Ambassador of India to Thailand H.E. Mr. Bhagwant Singh Bishnoi and Mrs.Rupa Bishnoi joined #HoliRangotsavBangkok2018 @SHOWDC in #Bangkok, organized by @vhpthailand. Holi, marks the arrival of spring, being one of the biggest festivals in Asia…

 

Lohri 2018: Why & how we celebrate the festival; wishes, messages, greetings to send to your loved ones

India is gearing up to celebrate Punjabi festival Lohri on January 13. During the festival that marks the end of winter season, people prepare delicious traditional recipes and dance around the bonfire.

One of the main Punjabi festivals, Lohri, is being celebrated on January 13 this year. It marks the culmination of winter with the worship of fire. This festival is meant to be celebrated on the shortest day and longest night of the year.

Families gather to cook a delicious spread of winter dishes, sing songs and offer special prayers to celebrate the festival.

People believe that lighting fire in the evening of Lohri signifies the start of longer days. The bonfire is the highlight of the celebration as it symbolises the end of winter. Also, Lohri is known as a harvest festival as, traditionally, it is the time to harvest sugarcane crops.

Therefore, sugarcane product jaggery (gurh) is the main sweet during this festival. Other items that are relished by people during this time are til (sesame) seeds, peanuts, and sweets like gazzak, rewri, etc. Also, radish is an important food item, which is harvested between October and January.

To celebrate Lohri, people, especially Punjabis, gather to form a circle around a bonfire and throw puffed rice and popcorn into it. They can be seen chanting “Aadae aye dilather jaye”, which means “May honour come and poverty vanish”, together.

 

The celebrations also include folk songs, men doing Bhangra on drum beats and women performing Gidda. Also, kite flying is a popular activity in Punjab during the festival, which is also known as Makar Sankranti.

As we celebrate the festival on Saturday, let’s wish our loved ones by sending them greetings.

May this festival of zeal and verve fill your life with lots of energy and enthusiasm and may it help you bring happiness and prosperity to you and your loved ones. Happy Lohri to one and all!

Punjabi Bhangra te makhan-malai,
Punjabi tadka te dal frai,
Tuhanu LOHRI de lakh lakh vadhai..!!
HAPPY LOHRI

Mithaa gurh te vich mil geya til
udi patang te khil geya dil
har pal sukh te har vele shanty
paao rabb agge dua tusi
Lohri khushiyaan naal manaao!
Happy Lohri

 

Sarson da Saag-Makki di Roti, Mungfali te Gajak… Lohri is here. Happy Lohri!

 

This Lohri, choose to burn all your sadness and welcome the spring happiness. May god bring joy, good times and lot of happy memories this year. Happy Lohri.

Twanu and twade pure pariwaar nu, Lohri di lakh lakh vadaiya. Babaji kare twanu saari khushiya mile aur eh saal ronaka laaye. Happy Lohri.

Let the light of the Lohri fire kill the darkness of your life. Happy Lohri

Miss World 2017 Manushi Chhillar’s journey at the prestigious pageant in China

manushichillarmissworld

Photo Credit:Instagram

20-year old Manushi Chhillar made the country proud when she was crowned as the Miss World 2017 in China, this evening. Beauty queens from 120 countries participated in the 67th edition of the event to bag the most prestigious beauty pageant title. But Manushi was determined and she got the crown back in the country, after 17 long years.

A 20-year old medical student from Haryana, Manushi shared in an interview,”As a kid, I always wanted to participate in the competition but I never knew I would make it this far. Winning the Miss World title is now not just my dream, but also that of my family and friends. I know it’s going to be a journey that I will never forget. Whatever the result, I am going to learn, enjoy and give it my best. The rest, I leave to destiny.”

She further added,” This is my one chance to show the world what India stands for and showcase the culture and values that I have been brought up with. I am going to make sure that the world remembers India.”

Earlier this year, Manushi competed against 29 contestants from all over the country and took over the crown from Miss India World 2016 Priyadarshini Chatterjee. This win opened various avenues for this young girl from Haryana, who once aspired to become a leading cardiac surgeon. But fate had different plans and Manushi has now become the reigning Miss World.

A complete package of beauty with brains, Manushi is made use of this platform to spread awareness about menstrual hygiene in the country. Apart from carrying out regular duties as Miss India, Manushi took time out for this cause which is very close to her heart and managed to visit over 20 villages to educate people about the same.  She shared,”The cause is close to my heart, and in my own way, I have managed to make a difference to the lives of about 5,000 women. If an organisation like Miss World backs it, it could reach a different level altogether”.

As this stunning beauty represented India in one of the leading beauty contests, here are glimpses from her Miss World journey.

The Style Souk