Are you tired of being at the mercy of banks when you move money? You may live in Thailand, but no doubt you want to send funds for bills, expenses, and your family all over the world. So, why does it feel like your money is shackled to your bank account? And why is the cost of releasing it so high?

In today’s society where we can live and work practically anywhere, moving money should be frictionless. But so often it isn’t.

High exchange rates, exorbitant bank/transaction fees, and hidden charges all work to cripple our hard-accumulated funds the minute we even consider sending money abroad. Sending money out of Thailand is both challenging and expensive—everyone’s least favorite combination of factors. Repeat an exchange transaction more than once, and you may as well gift wrap your money for the bank with a bow.

We know you’re not alone with these frustrations too. Members of expat forums for cities all over Thailand see the oft-repeated question time and again, “What’s the best way to send my money abroad?” Because to date, there hasn’t been a cost-effective, transparent solution available.

SWIFT transactions—which are anything but—are expensive, just like Western Union. Thai Bank transfers for foreigners involve tedious forms and multiple document verification followed by a three-day wait just to attach an international account to your personal one. That’s before you then suffer the high exchange rates and processing fees of up to, and beyond, 1300 THB. Attaching a business account—don’t bother trying.

Sure, it’s free to send money through PayPal, but your recipient loses out on a significant chunk at the other end thanks to the company’s high commission charges which take some finding on their website. Payoneer’s ‘Global Payment Service’ is yet to include THB. So first, you need to exchange your money before you can ACH it across to another country. And TransferWise doesn’t offer the capability to upload THB. (Yes, you can trade THB, but you can’t add it to your balance—even with the new borderless account.)

But what am I telling you this for? You know all this already and have chalked up the frustrations to “This Is Thailand.”

There is, however, a new solution. At the top of Soi 8 on Sukhumvit Road is the headquarters for DeeMoney. With just one form of ID, you can register to become a member in a matter of moments. DeeMoney is the ONLY non-bank in Thailand to hold the required special international money transfer and money exchange licenses, issued by the Bank of Thailand, for moving THB abroad. We cater to 5000+ customers already.

 

Launched in July 2018, DeeMoney is partnered with Moneygram for global distribution. We also leverage direct partnerships for countries outside of the Moneygram network to ensure customers can send money to 16 countries as swiftly and easily as possible. For these 16 countries, we charge a single FLAT fee of 150 baht for ALL transfer amounts. Which means you can send up to 800,000 THB and still only pay 150 THB for the opportunity.

Compare this with other companies and banks mentioned above which stagger rates the more you wish to send, and the savings become astronomical.

In addition to ease of registration, there’s also a DeeMoney app available on Android and from the App Store. The app works with KPlus linking quickly and easily to your Thai bank account or you have the option to pay for your transfer through a QR Code too. Now you can send money abroad anytime, anywhere all from your phone. There’s no need to log on to a laptop to make an international bank transfer—consider that a thing of the past.

The 150THB FLAT rate is for transfers to Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, the UK, the US, and Vietnam.

No hidden charges. No high exchange rates. No additional transaction fees. Everything is as clear as Dee.

DeeMoney, what are you waiting for?

 

U-19 Cricket World Cup: India Beat Australia By 8 Wickets

Australia, who had little hesitation in batting first, were guilty of not converting starts into big partnerships.


India beat Australia by eight wickets to win record fourth U-19 World Cup.

Australia, who had little hesitation in batting first, were guilty of not converting starts into big partnerships.

Merlo and Param Uppal (34) were involved in a 75-run stand for the fourth wicket before the innings’ top-scorer shared 49-runs with Nathan McSweeney (23) to set the platform for a competitive total.

However, the momentum shifted hugely into India’s favour when Shiva (2/36) set up Sweeney to have the batsman caught and bowled, leaving Australia at 183 for five.

Earlier, India’s leading wicket-taker Roy (2/32) had sent back Uppal in similar fashion as offered a simple catch back to the bowler while attempting to play against the spin.

While Indian spinners delivered under pressure in the middle overs, the pacers were impressive again upfront and towards the end.

Hitting through the line was not easy as the surface was on the slower side. The best example of that was the dismissal of openers Jack Edwards (28) and Max Bryant (14).

Pacer Ishan Porel (2/30) got rid of both the openers who punched a rising ball straight to cover.

Kamlesh Nagarkoti (2/41), another find for India in the tournament, removed Australian captain Jason Sangha (13) that moved away just enough to take the edge to the wicket-keeper.

Nagarkoti along with Shivam Mavi (1/46) also helped in polishing off the tail after Shiva’s accurate throw from deep had Baxter Bolt run out on 13.

(PTI)

India beat Australia by 8 wickets in final Test in Dharamsala to win series 2-1

India beat Australia by 8 wickets in final Test in Dharamsala to win series 2-1, reclaim Border-Gavaskar Trophy

India 106 for 2 (Rahul 51*) and 332 (Jadeja 63, Rahul 60, Pujara 57, Lyon 5-92) beat Australia 300 (Smith 111, Wade 57, Warner 56, Kuldeep 4-68) and 137 (Maxwell 45, Jadeja 3-24, Ashwin 3-29, Umesh 3-29) by eight wickets
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details

Ajinkya Rahane sent a 146kph bouncer from Pat Cummins flying into the crowd at midwicket and, next ball, slapped another short one over the cover fence while backing away. These were the blows that finally snuffed out the last of Australia’s fight, and sealed once and for all India’s victory in this most bewitching of Border-Gavaskar series.

Australia entered the fourth morning with only the scantest of hopes, defending a mere 87 runs and needing 10 wickets. This did not mean that contest was over, as Josh Hazlewood and Pat Cummins fired the ball down with pace and venom after a night’s refreshment. The loss of M Vijay and Cheteshwar Pujara – the latter run out by a brilliant throw from Glenn Maxwell – kept Australia hoping. But KL Rahul and Rahane responded with bold blows to settle the matter.

The win in Dharamsala ended India’s marathon home Test season with four series victories out of four, and also means that the team presently holds series honours over every other nation in the five-day game. Rahane’s stand-in captaincy, in the absence of the injured Virat Kohli, had been vital to this achievement, so too the runs of Rahul, the pace of Umesh Yadav and the all-round contribution of Ravindra Jadeja. There will be great satisfaction derived also from the fact that Dharamsala offered conditions more familiar to the tourists.

For that reason, among others, Steven Smith’s team were left to ponder a string of missed opportunities after their vast opening win in Pune. There have been times in all three Tests since that the Australians have looked very much in control of proceedings, but they have been unable to stay on the mountaintop under pressure from an Indian side roused into action by the shock of that first-up hiding.

As the ball continued to bounce and swerve when India resumed their pursuit of a modest target today, Australia’s fielders must have wondered what might have been with another 100 or so runs to defend. Josh Hazlewood went up for a pair of vociferous lbw appeals against Vijay in the opening over, but on both occasions the opener got the merest of bat to ball before it struck the pad.

At the other end Cummins sent a bouncer down the leg side that may have touched Vijay’s gloves before being taken on the juggle by Matthew Wade. Certainly Ultra Edge indicated as much, but only Wade raised the most half-hearted of appeals. More straightforward was another edge in Cummins’ next over, near enough to an action replay of Vijay’s first-innings dismissal, which offered a glimmer of light for Australia.

Genuine excitement followed when Pujara and Rahul hesitated fatally in taking a quick single to the right arm of Maxwell, who threw down middle stump to send Pujara on his way with 60 still needed. In those moments the Australians wondered briefly what might be possible, and the Indian viewing area tensed up like with so many teams chasing a pesky small target in the past.

But Rahane and Rahul barely put a foot out of place in the overs that followed, accumulating steadily until Cummins elected to go around the wicket for the tourists’ final effort. Rahane’s riposte, the first impressively orthodox, the second more redolent of the forthcoming IPL, said much about India’s admirable resilience in the face of a most unexpected challenge.

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. @danbrettig

Ashwin’s 6 for 41 helps India defend 188

Tea Australia 276 and 101 for 6 (Handscomb 19*, Ashwin 3-35) need another 87 runs to beat India 189 and 274 (Pujara 92, Rahane 52, Rahul 51, Hazlewood 6-67)

What a great Test. This comeback from India sets up the series nicely. The final day lived up to its expectations. The whole Test was great. We have people at the ground to report and analyse what happened and what the fallout of this is. Thanks for joining us here, and do come back to read and watch the fallout. Goodbye

“Great Test match,” says Steven Smith. “Certainly ebbed and floed throughout. I am proud of the way the boys played it. The partnership between Rahane and Pujara hurt us. They played really well. And we weren’t up for it today. It was quite hard to play. Bit up and down with the quicks throughout the match, and that rough outside off. Quite difficult but Test match cricket is not supposed to be easy. A wicket like that, always umpires have to make a lot of calls. Everyone makes mistakes. Not that I am saying they made any. Series is well and truly alive. Great two Tests. Plenty to play for when we go to Ranchi.”

“After losing the first Test the way we did,” says Virat Kohli. “We wanted to bounce back and not show anyone but ourselves what we are made of. They showed the intent and the belief that we can win from any position. It was about taking responsibility. The way they showed heart and character, along with the crowd, is unbelievable. The moment they did not score big in the second innings, we knew we had a chance. We knew if we got anything over 150, we had a chance. After conceding the lead, Pujara and Rahane had a champion partnership. Two best Test batsmen we have got, so much character and technique and heart. Wriddhi’s knock in the end, Ishant’s application, that was a bonus. We would have liked anything over 200, we thought from 225 there was only one winner. The moment we got 187, we knew we needed in-out fields, we needed to finish it today. Can’t wait for Ranchi. We need to push that momentum further. The team is not going to look back now.”

“There is no better place for to perform like I did,” says KL Rahul, the Man of the Match. “After that first loss, to come here and do what we did is really really special. we have achieved a lot but this win for a young team will be really really special. I have played all my cricket here. I told them if we get 150 lead we will win by 30. We knew the third day was the best day to bat on, and the approach from us was brilliant. There was a time they said when I get past 20 I get a hundred. That was a problem. Now if we get just fifty, that is a problem. On a serious note, I was disappointed. Openers need to get big runs. This was a disappointment but now that we have won, that disappointment is gone. My shouldr gets quite sore, I can’t dive, and I have to restrict a couple of shots. It is not such a bad thing. I can bat within myself. I am enjoying batting with the problem”

Happy Indian team, and happy quotes from them all. We have heard from Ashwin, Yadav, Pujara and Rahane. We are yet to hear from Smith, Kohli and most probably KL Rahul, who should be the Man of the Match

“It was not coming out of the hand all right,” says R Ashwin. “I was trying to turn it too hard. One good thing I did was when wickets were not coming, I kept the runs down. We just spoke inside the dressing room to bowl some short spells and keep changing over. That is why we were rotating so we could attack through such short balls.”

“We were just trying to hit the deck hard,” says Umesh Yadav. “We knew from where the ball was keeping up and down. Every time we were trying to hit the wickets. Always a pleasure playing with Ishant. He gives me ideas on how to bowl.”

“We were not thinking too far ahead,” says Ajinkya Rahane. “We knew 200 would be tough to get on this pitch. We wanted to unsettle the spinners. We wanted to dominate, not through boundaries, but through singles.”

“It is a great feeling to beat Australia,” says Cheteshwar Pujara. “The way we were so far behind, it is a great satisfaction. We just wanted a partnership. The balls were staying low. The way Nathan Lyon bowled in the first innings, we needed a Plan B, and we had it. Anything over 200 was almost impossible here. Once we crossed 150, we were confident. When I went in to bat, I never thought about the runs. I just had a positive intent. Now probably we will have the psychological advantage the way we have played.”

Ashwin and Kohli, as usual, share the spotlight, but the team makes it a point to thank Jadeja. They must also thank Rahul, Pujara and Rahane. Rahul for keeping them alive with his twin fifties, and Pujara and Rahane for that wicketless session yesterday to put India ahead. This is India’s ninth win this season, but might taste the sweetest after the crisis they found themselves in

Meanwhile, in another country, another sport, but the one and only Nagraj Gollapudi. He makes his debut as a badminton correspondent on our sister site ESPN.in and he’s covering the All England Open, which starts later today. Saina, Sindhu, Lin Dan, the Great Danes, all in action over the next few days.

 

At tea on the fourth day in Bengaluru, only one thing was certain: this Test would not be a draw. But a trophy-securing win for Australia? A series-levelling victory for India? A tie? Any of those outcomes seemed plausible. A session full of tension finished with Australia needing 87 runs to retain the Border-Gavaskar Trophy, and their brisk run-rate gave them a chance. But India required only four wickets, and on this pitch, such strikes could come quickly.

Set 188 to win on a dry, cracking surface offering variable bounce, the Australians went to tea on 101 for 6, having just lost Mitchell Marsh and Matthew Wade shortly before the break. Those strikes made India the favourites, though Australia would not have been unhappy at the tea break halting India’s momentum. The key man for Australia was Peter Handscomb, the last remaining member of the top six, who had used his feet well and went to tea on 19.

It was a session in which every ball felt like a possible wicket, and in which every run was cheered by the Australians. It was also a session in which Australia’s use of the DRS cost them. David Warner was given out early in the session, lbw trying to sweep R Ashwin on 17, and his review was struck down when umpire’s call was shown for impact and off stump. The loss of that review almost certainly prevented Shaun Marsh using one five overs later.

Marsh had shouldered arms to Umesh Yadav, who was coming around the wicket, and was given out by umpire Nigel Llong when struck on the pad. Unsure whether he should ask for a review, Marsh consulted his partner, Steven Smith, and the end result was that Marsh walked off. A review would have saved him: it was a poor decision from Llong, the ball clearly going to miss off stump by some distance.

The review system was again in the spotlight soon afterwards when Smith was struck by a grubber from Umesh, and seemed to signal to the Australian dressing room for advice on whether to have the call reviewed. Llong stepped in to prevent the communication, Virat Kohli also objected, and Smith walked off for 28. A review would have been futile: he couldn’t have been plumber if he’d been wearing a Super Mario costume.

Mitchell Marsh struck three quick boundaries before he was caught in close off Ashwin for 13, and Wade could not survive until tea, out for a fifth-ball duck when his inside edge lobbed off his pad and up for Wriddhiman Saha to take a diving catch. It left Australia six down, after the session had began with Matt Renshaw edging behind an excellent seamer from Ishant Sharma.

Lunch had marked the innings break after Josh Hazlewood led an excellent bowling display from the visitors and picked up 6 for 67. Hazlewood and Mitchell Starc were both devastating during a new-ball spell that earned Australia five wickets in 19 deliveries, before a last-wicket partnership between Wriddhiman Saha and Ishant Sharma nudged India’s lead to 187.

Hazlewood’s figures were the best by an Australia fast bowler in a Test innings in India for 37 years, since Geoff Dymock claimed 7 for 67 at Kanpur in October 1979. India started the morning at 213 for 4 and hoped to extend their lead past 200, but the work of Australia’s fast bowlers made that a difficult ask, and India were bowled out for 274, having added 61 to their overnight total for the loss of their last six wickets.

Starc started the carnage by swinging the new ball in to Ajinkya Rahane, who on 52 was rapped on the pad and given not out by umpire Llong. However, Smith opted for a review and it was a good one for Australia as the decision was overturned. Next ball, Karun Nair failed to handle Starc’s pace and swing and tickled an inside edge onto his stumps, and such was the ferocity of the delivery that the leg stump shattered on impact.

Starc’s hat-trick delivery was negotiated by Saha, if not concvincingly then at least effectively, but in the next over Hazlewood picked up an even more important wicket. Cheteshwar Pujara looked set for a century, having resumed on 79, but on 92 he failed to handle a shortish Hazlewood ball that was fended to gully, where Mitchell Marsh took the catch. Three balls later, R Ashwin was bowled by one that stayed low, and Hazlewood had two in the over.

In Hazlewood’s next over he accounted for Umesh, who swung hard and was caught at mid-off, and it looked as tough Australia might run through the tail quickly. But Ishant and Saha hung in for a 16-run tenth-wicket stand that could yet prove crucial, and which ended when Ishant drove a catch to cover off the spin of Steve O’Keefe.

 

 

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. @brydoncoverdale

Pakistan crashes out of #WorldT20 after loosing to Australia by 21 runs in Mohali

World T20, 26th Match, Super 10 Group 2: Australia v Pakistan at Mohali, Mar 25, 2016

during the ICC WT20 India Group 2 match between Pakistan and Australia at I.S. Bindra Stadium on March 25, 2016 in Mohali, India.
James Faulkner’s maiden T20I five-wicket haul helped Australia keep Pakistan to 172 in their chase of 194 in a crucial match in Mohali © Getty Images during the ICC WT20 India Group 2 match between Pakistan and Australia at I.S. Bindra Stadium on March 25, 2016 in Mohali, India.

Australia innings (20 overs maximum) RMB4s6sSR
View dismissalUT Khawajab Wahab Riaz21181631131.25
3.4 Wahab has Khawaja now. He lets out a roar. Khawaja steps away outside leg to crash this through the covers. But this was a full missile. Khawaja can’t make contact. Thde left-arm quick pings the middle stump. It gets tilted back 28/1
View dismissalAJ Finchb Imad Wasim1537161093.75
7.2 The arm-ball does the trick. Australia’s top-three batsmen have all been bowled. This rushes on off the surface, snakes in, keeps low. Beats Finch’s defences and raps middle 57/3
View dismissalDA Warnerb Wahab Riaz98620150.00
5.1 Wahab nails the stumps again, hits the top of middle. Warner is gone now. 148.1ks dynamite! Back of a length and ducks back in, Warner, who had aimed to make swinging room and open up the off side, is caught in an awkward tangle. Wahab KO’s Warner. The stumps light up… 42/2
SPD Smith*not out61624370141.86
View dismissalGJ Maxwellc Ahmed Shehzad b Imad Wasim30241831166.66
13.4 Maxi holes out to long-on now. Pushed through flat, Maxi slogs, and miscues it to Shehzad, who completes a good overhead catch 119/4
SR Watsonnot out44282143209.52
Extras(lb 8, w 5)13
Total(4 wickets; 20 overs)193(9.65 runs per over)
BowlingOMRWEcon0s4s6s
Mohammad Amir403909.751142(1w)
Mohammad Sami4053013.25672(3w)
View wicketsWahab Riaz403528.751041
3.4 to Khawaja, Wahab has Khawaja now. He lets out a roar. Khawaja steps away outside leg to crash this through the covers. But this was a full missile. Khawaja can’t make contact. Thde left-arm quick pings the middle stump. It gets tilted back 28/1
5.1 to Warner, Wahab nails the stumps again, hits the top of middle. Warner is gone now. 148.1ks dynamite! Back of a length and ducks back in, Warner, who had aimed to make swinging room and open up the off side, is caught in an awkward tangle. Wahab KO’s Warner. The stumps light up… 42/2
Shahid Afridi402706.75520
View wicketsImad Wasim403127.75530
7.2 to Finch, The arm-ball does the trick. Australia’s top-three batsmen have all been bowled. This rushes on off the surface, snakes in, keeps low. Beats Finch’s defences and raps middle 57/3
13.4 to Maxwell, Maxi holes out to long-on now. Pushed through flat, Maxi slogs, and miscues it to Shehzad, who completes a good overhead catch 119/4
Pakistan innings (target: 194 runs from 20 overs) RB4s6sSR
View dismissalSharjeel Khanb Faulkner301960157.89
5.3 Sharjeel’s joyride is over! Again not all that short, but Sharjeel is tempted into that big pull. He goes hard and can only drag it on to his leg stump off a thickish inside edge. And the required rate has shot to 10.62 40/2
View dismissalAhmed Shehzadc Coulter-Nile b Hazlewood160016.66
2.5 Shehzad swings now, top-edges it into the hands of NCN at mid-off, just behind the bowler. Head-high clasp Back of a length and angled in around off, Shehzad targets the leg side with an ambitious slog and makes a mess of it. He ends up offering a skier 20/1
View dismissalKhalid Latifb Faulkner464141112.19
17.3 third time’s the charm. Back of the hand slower ball on middle, Latif swings early to the leg side and does not connect. Faulkner hits the timber and lets out a roar 147/5
View dismissalUmar Akmalb Zampa322031160.00
10.3 bowled’em. Zampa gives this plenty of air, it dips and hits the stumps. Umar drops to one knee for a slog sweep, but does not make contact. Nice change up in pace and flight, the middle stump is pushed back 85/3
View dismissalShahid Afridi*st †Nevill b Zampa14702200.00
13.2 Six and out, sums up Afridi! He ventures down the track again. The legspinner retorts. He darts it flatter and wider outside off. Turns away with bounce. Afridi can’t reach and connect. Nevill does the rest. Is that Afridi’s final innings for Pakistan? 110/4
Shoaib Maliknot out402022200.00
View dismissalImad Wasimc Coulter-Nile b Faulkner01000.00
17.4 The back-of-the-hand slower ball does the damage again. Back of a length and turning away outside off, Imad Wasim throws his bat at it and skews it in the air. NCN runs across from cover and pouches it 147/6
View dismissalSarfraz Ahmedc Khawaja b Faulkner230066.66
19.1 Faulkner gets his fourth! Sarfraz attempts a reverse sweep against a back of the hand slower ball. He can only spoon a catch to backward point (or square leg if you’d like? 164/7
View dismissalWahab Riazc Hazlewood b Faulkner01000.00
19.2 Make that a five-for, the first in this tournament! Afridi can’t watch this in the dug out. He has his head down with his eyes closed. Wahab swings and sends a top edge to short third man 164/8
Mohammad Saminot out4210200.00
Extras(b 1, lb 1, w 1)3
Total(8 wickets; 20 overs)172(8.60 runs per over)
BowlingOMRWEcon0s4s6s
View wicketJR Hazlewood402616.501130(1w)
2.5 to Ahmed Shehzad, Shehzad swings now, top-edges it into the hands of NCN at mid-off, just behind the bowler. Head-high clasp Back of a length and angled in around off, Shehzad targets the leg side with an ambitious slog and makes a mess of it. He ends up offering a skier 20/1
NM Coulter-Nile4045011.25771
View wicketsJP Faulkner402756.751121
5.3 to Sharjeel Khan, Sharjeel’s joyride is over! Again not all that short, but Sharjeel is tempted into that big pull. He goes hard and can only drag it on to his leg stump off a thickish inside edge. And the required rate has shot to 10.62 40/2
17.3 to Khalid Latif, third time’s the charm. Back of the hand slower ball on middle, Latif swings early to the leg side and does not connect. Faulkner hits the timber and lets out a roar 147/5
17.4 to Imad Wasim, The back-of-the-hand slower ball does the damage again. Back of a length and turning away outside off, Imad Wasim throws his bat at it and skews it in the air. NCN runs across from cover and pouches it 147/6
19.1 to Sarfraz Ahmed, Faulkner gets his fourth! Sarfraz attempts a reverse sweep against a back of the hand slower ball. He can only spoon a catch to backward point (or square leg if you’d like? 164/7
19.2 to Wahab Riaz, Make that a five-for, the first in this tournament! Afridi can’t watch this in the dug out. He has his head down with his eyes closed. Wahab swings and sends a top edge to short third man 164/8
SR Watson2027013.50131
View wicketsA Zampa403228.00612
10.3 to Umar Akmal, bowled’em. Zampa gives this plenty of air, it dips and hits the stumps. Umar drops to one knee for a slog sweep, but does not make contact. Nice change up in pace and flight, the middle stump is pushed back 85/3
13.2 to Shahid Afridi, Six and out, sums up Afridi! He ventures down the track again. The legspinner retorts. He darts it flatter and wider outside off. Turns away with bounce. Afridi can’t reach and connect. Nevill does the rest. Is that Afridi’s final innings for Pakistan? 110/4
GJ Maxwell201306.50401

Match details


Toss – Australia, who chose to bat
Points – Australia 2, Pakistan 0
Umpires – HDPK Dharmasena (Sri Lanka) and M Erasmus (South Africa)
TV umpire – RK Illingworth (England)
Match referee – RS Madugalle (Sri Lanka)
Reserve umpire – NJ Llong (England)

 

 

Australia’s captain Steven Smith won the toss and chose to bat against Pakistan in their vital World Twenty20 match at the PCA Stadium in Mohali.

Pakistan must win to stand any chance of staying in the tournament, while an Australian victory would ensure that they do not need to worry about net run-rate ahead of their clash with India .

Smith named another reshuffled Australian side. The soon-to-retire Shane Watson dropped down the order to make room for the return of Aaron Finch at the expense of Mitchell Marsh. Josh Hazlewood was included ahead of John Hastings in the hope the Mohali pitch will have some additional bounce.

Pakistan recalled the fit-again Wahab Riaz in place of Mohammad Irfan, who was described as resting by his captain Shahid Afridi.

Australia 1 Aaron Finch, 2 Usman Khawaja, 3 David Warner, 4 Steven Smith (capt), 5 Shane Watson, 6 Glenn Maxwell, 7 James Faulkner, 8 Peter Nevill (wk), 9 Nathan Coulter-Nile, 10 Adam Zampa, 11 Josh Hazlewood

Pakistan 1 Sharjeel Khan, 2 Ahmed Shehzad, 3 Khalid Latif, 4 Umar Akmal, 5 Shoaib Malik, 6 Sarfraz Ahmed (wk), 7 Shahid Afridi (capt), 8 Imad Wasim, 9 Wahab Riaz, 10 Mohammad Sami, 11 Mohammad Amir

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. @danbrettig

Narendra Modi comes top in global survey of leaders, Xi Jinping second

Beijing: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has pipped Chinese president Xi Jinping to secure the top rank in handling domestic and international affairs in a global survey conducted by a Chinese firm.

In the ‘China’s National Image Global Survey 2014, conducted in nine countries- the US, UK, Australia, Japan, South Africa, India, Russia, Brazil and China- Modi’s handling of domestic and international affairs has won him the top rank while Xi figured second.

1-684

“Xi’s handling of both domestic and international affairs has won high praise. He ranks second, after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, for his capability of handling domestic and international affairs,” Wang Gangyi, vice-president of China International Publishing Group, said citing the survey report, which was released in Beijing on Wednesday.

The survey, based on 4,500 respondents from the nine countries, was conducted by the Centre for International Communication Studies of China Foreign Languages Publishing Administration, Millward Brown and Lightspeed GMI.

The survey also found that Xi was the fourth best-known among the leaders of the nine countries, with 70% of the respondents having heard of him, after US President Barack Obama (97 per cent), Russian President Vladimir Putin (91 per cent) and British Prime Minister David Cameron (86 per cent), it said.

Source: http://www.indiatvnews.com/news/world/modi-pips-xi-jinping-in-handling-domestic-international-affairs-23506.html

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